We believe that contained within the art of tea tastings we find balance.  Within this art we slow our breath and embrace this present moment.  It holds the coming together of the past and the future of time itself.  Time and space become one.  We learn of relationship.  We develop connection through the fullness of our own singularity.  We learn about the relationship of ourselves to the many facets of life.  Contained in the practice of meditation and prayer we learn of our inner world.   While we taste the warming beverage of tea we blend the opposites of life.  We balance these opposites through the focus of our senses.  We utilize our breath to connect to the aromas expressed in the tea.   We spearhead our attention in the harmonies of the color, aromas, and then the flavors of tea.  We discover the intent of those that planted, nurtured, and harvested the tea.  We taste the mastery of the blender through their vision.   We explore the synergy of herbs, teas and the outcomes.  We maximize the potential of relationship, that to our inner core, our soul, and then to others.

While we slow our attention to the magic held within the flavors of our tea we also slow our scope of thought.  We reduce the scope of life to a small slice of time.  The regrets of the past and the fears of the future silently funnel into the beauty of this present moment.  The subsequent slowing of our breath slows the pace of our mind.  Day and night, light and darkness cease to be separate.  The yin and yang of life find contentment in the beautiful integration of the tea’s aromas, flavors and colors.  The umami of life itself unfolds through the many flavors of the tea.  We now create new perspectives. The material and spiritual find balance.  The separation of the head and the heart are no more. Heaven and earth become one.  Our process of breath through the inhalation and the exhalation are one complete unifying process. The space between breaths takes upon a life of its own.  The zero point on a number line lives and is now packed with meaning and purpose. We find value and fullness in the dimension held within this emptiness.  Love, as a seedling breaks through the top soil of a yearning heart.

We understand the whole through its parts; its opposites and contradictions.  We now embrace all the divisiveness life has to offer.  We comprehend. Through this comprehension we find peace.  We discover contentment.  We become aware how light contains the fullness of its color spectrum.  We learn how through its absence springs darkness.  Through the absence of sound, we discover the potential of silence. Thus, in the absence of light we find darkness hovering with possibilities.  We begin to feel the dawn of compassion. We observe it unfold its form and wonder through its beautifully inspiring structure.

We call this method of tea consumption, the American Tea Ceremony.  The wonders of the American Spirit and its many contradictions find its fullness through it opposites and contradictions.  The varied aspects of sound and the multitudes of blending light are but a reflection and reverberation of America itself.  Through this artform of a tea ceremony we honor these divisions.  We embrace them and find joy and harmony within them for this is America.  It is similar to the complexities we discover within ourselves.  We open the heart to display this same rainbow of diversity and precision. Through its apparent contradictions there is a magic and a splendor of beautiful precision.

In the slow pace of tea consumption, we hear for the first time.  We cease to be deaf.  We listen to the sounds of the universe within.  We observe for the first time.  The light within takes shape.  We begin to hear and listen to the fulcrum of life within the center of our conscious awareness.  We find the purity of the observer.  We now are aware of the inner meaning and purpose of our existence. The opposites contained within the whole find balance.  We bring harmony to our outer world because we have now discovered it within our inner world.  Our lives are now a reflection of what shines forth from our inner spirit.  We balance the opposites of meditation and prayer as well the balancing poles of health and well-being.   The mystery of tasting tea now becomes alive with possibilities.  Our journey now makes sense.  Our discoveries now have value and meaning. Through the singularity of our inner connections, we now enjoy the completeness of relationship.

In prayer we speak to God.  In meditation we listen for His response.  In tea we embrace the wonder and beauty of that dialogue.

Robert Louis Stevenson once said, ‘So long as we love, we serve”. 

In our attempt to serve you, we would like to encourage tea consumption.  As we have come to understand its many benefits to both health and well-being, we hope to assist you in the process of finding balance through tea.  For this reason, we will be conducting tea tastings throughout the United States so that we may attempt to build relationships from within and without.                                                                                                                                                         


 

History of the Tea Ceremony

The Tea Ceremony

A Brief History

Perhaps one of the most fascinating arts that has come to be linked with the samurai is the cha no yu, or tea ceremony. Few activities in general are quite as thoroughly refined and thoughtful and yet evolved through such troubled times. Complicated and yet utterly simple, at once straightforward and deep, the tea ceremony in many ways could be a metaphor not only for the samurai ideal but also for the land of Japan itself.

Tea was made popular in Japan during the early Kamakura largely thanks to the efforts of the monk Eisai (1141-1215); fifty or so years later the Zen monk Dai-o (1236-1308) returned from a visit to China and brought with him knowledge of the tea ceremony as it was practiced in Chinese Zen monasteries. Successive monks refined the art until the priest Shûko (1422-1502) presented a demonstration to the shogun Ashikaga Yoshimasa. Yoshimasa, already a man of the arts, took to the tea ceremony almost immediately and at this point the cha no yu began developing a secular following.

Initially, and unsurprisingly, the tea ceremony was an activity indulged by the nobility, as tea itself was primarily the elixir of the upper class at this time. This began to change with the advent of Sen no Rikyû. A man of merchant background from Sakai, Rikyû (known for much of his career as Sôeki) had been trained as a tea man in the elegant Ashikaga style; he would in time reject this school in favor of a very different approach. The nobility’s tea ceremony had been developed to cater to the sorts of individuals that partook of it, with elegant Chinese utensils and great pains taken to avoid offending any guests of higher status. In his own take, Rikyû substituted the pricey utensils with simple, practical ones, and replaced the expensive and often gaudy teahouses of the nobility with the Sôan, or ‘grass hut’ style teahouse. The only way into the tearoom of a Sôan was through a small door, the nijiriguchi, which was only some two and a half feet square. Guests therefore entered by crawling, a deliberately humbling device intended to create a sense of equality once inside.1 Rikyû intended for the tea ceremony to be an activity free from social and political trappings, though in this he was to be disappointed. As Rikyû was making a name for himself, the warlord Oda Nobunaga was also gaining fame through his steady expansion and at length came to meet Rikyû. An enthusiastic amateur tea man, Nobunaga made every effort to surround himself with men versed in the cha no yu, which by 1575 included Sen no Rikyû, Imai Sokyu, and Tsuda Sogyu. The great warrior also went to great lengths to secure valuable tea items, which he doled out from time to time as rewards to his generals.

Nobunaga was killed in 1582 and in time Rikyû became a close companion of Toyotomi hideyoshi, the second of the ‘three unifiers’. Like Nobunaga, Hideyoshi was an aspiring tea aficionado, and valued Rikyû’s skills highly. Nonetheless, the two men did not always see eye to eye when it came to the cha no yu. Rikyû is said to have frowned on his master’s use of the tea ceremony as a forum to discuss matters of state, which he saw as disturbing if not altogether nullifying the harmony of the ceremony. Hideyoshi in fact took the ceremony and turned it into an important part of his statecraft. He organized grand tea gatherings, and sought out famous tea items, although in the actual practice of the ceremony, he more or less adhered to Rikyû’s precepts. In the end, and for reasons unknown, Rikyû was executed on Hideyoshi’s orders, though not before leaving a lasting mark on the art of tea, which by the Edo Period had spread through the classes.

A Brief Description

The tea ceremony normally took place in a tearoom, the chachitsu. The guests entered through the nijiriguchi, with samurai leaving their swords outside (another conscious equalizer developed by Rikyû) and the last to enter closing the door behind him. The tearoom was arranged so that those entering would first spy a scroll hanging in the tokonoma – or alcove. This scroll was normally of calligraphy, with its subject often that of a simple observation such as Honrai mu Ichibutsu (‘Originally there is nothing’).2 As this scroll is carefully chosen by the host to reflect a mood or the season, the guests customarily spend a moment appreciating it before seating themselves around a small hearth in the center of the room.

At this point the host enters, and the principal guest thanks him or her for their invitation and politely inquires about the scroll or some other object in the room should one be present. However, and throughout the time spent in the tearoom, conversations and articulations are brief, and it was considered impolite to speak of things not related to the ceremony. The principle guest then serves a light meal (kaiseki) that was intended to be pleasing to the eye as well as the taste. At this time, a modest serving of sake is also offered in shallow bowls, followed by a piece of fruit or some other light dessert. The guests then exit the tearoom while the host prepares it for the drinking of tea, replacing the scroll with a single flower in a vase. When the guests return, the host heats water in an iron kettle, then rinses and wipes the tea bowl and utensils. He places powdered green tea in a bowl with a bamboo dipper, then whips the tea with a whisk (also bamboo) until the surface is slightly frothy, then serves it to his guests.

Two kinds of tea will be served: koicha, which is the more formal of the two and possessed of a thicker consistency and bitter taste, and usucha – thinner and more ‘informal’. Koicha is served first, and all the guests drink a small quantity from the same bowl. Later in the ceremony, usucha is served in individual bowls. The tea bowls themselves can vary in design according to the host and the season. ‘Winter’ tea bowls are deeper, to help contain heat, while ‘summer’ bowls are shallower and broader to release the heat and give the impression of coolness.

 

 
A modern Japanese Tea House overlooking a Zen rock garden in Ôita Prefecture, Japan

Throughout the ceremony, the hosts and guests both aspire towards a sense of tranquility. The priest Takuan wrote of preparing for a tea ceremony and said, “and let this all be carried out in accordance with the idea that in this room we can enjoy the streams and rocks as we do the rivers and mountains in Nature, and appreciate the various moods and sentiments suggested by the snow, the moon, and the trees and flowers, as they go through the transformation of seasons, appearing and disappearing, blooming and withering. As visitors are greeted here with due reverence, we listen quietly to the boiling water in the kettle, which sounds like a breeze passing through the pine needles, and become oblivious of all worldly woes and worries…”3

Sen no Rikyû himself left this piece of advice as the final of his Hundred Rules for cha no yu: “Though you may cleave to these rules and sometimes break them, and though you don’t take them seriously, don’t quite forget them.”4

 

NOTES

1. The typical Ashikaga-style teahouse included a separate door for the most exalted guest to enter through.

2. A famous phrase from the Platform Sutra of the Sixth Patriarch.

3. Zen and Japanese Culture pg. 276-277

4. Mirror, Sword and Jewel pg. 114

SOUCRES

Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (ed.) Warlords, Artists, and Commoners Hawaii 1981

Okakura Kakuzo The Book of Tea Dover 1964

Singer, Kurt Mirror, Sword and Jewel Kodansha 1981

Suzuki, D. T Zen and Japanese Culture Princeton 1970

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Humility

Humility

Humility is the mother of all virtues; purity, charity and obedience. It is in being humble that our love becomes real, devoted and ardent. If you are humble nothing will touch you, neither praise nor disgrace, because you know what you are. If you are blamed you will not be discouraged. If they call you a saint you will not put yourself on a pedestal.
― Mother Teresa
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Know Thyself – Socrates, 400 BC

“Know Thyself”

 

Socrates

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About Us

About Us

 

 

Samurai means “to serve.”

Tamurai means “to serve through tea.”

 

At Tamurai Tea our goal is to honor the spirit of health and well-being.

We begin with the selection and consumption of high quality tea. Through the consumption of tea, we make the connection to the earth and the sun. As our astronauts and NASA researchers continue to learn, only the connection to our earth, our atmospherically filtered sunlight, and that which they produce can sustain life as we know it.   Through this connection and creation, our mind, body, and soul are supplied with a cascade of life sustaining nutrients and antioxidants. Certain combinations of these nutrients are found only in the various teas created by our wonderful planet. The teas we support and supply are organic due to the fact tea is one of the few consumable products which makes its way directly from field to cup without any cleaning or washing. If a tea plant or tea field is sprayed with toxic harmful chemicals or fertilizers, they are consumed with the tea.  An additional considration is that when consuming the highest quality of tea: the first growth, the earliest picking; the highest concentration of nutrients are consumed.  Older tea leaves are found to be out of balance, with higher concentrations of minerals that may be harmful to our health.

 

“In this life we cannot do great things. We can only do small things with great love.”                                                                      Mother Teresa

 

Nature designs tea to be consumed at a slower pace, so we encourage tea to explore the internal universe within each of us. As we unfold the discoveries within, we can then make the peaceful and harmonious connections with those we encounter in life. These connections whether individual or shared bring much satisfaction and joy. It is with this spirit of joy we thank you for sharing your journey of tea, spirit, and life. It is with great honor that we recommend and make available the products and services contained within.

 

“For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also.”                                                         Mathew 6:21

 

                                                                    

 

 “I have three treasures, which I guard and keep.  The first is compassion.  The second is economy.  The third is humility.  From compassion comes courage.  From economy comes the means to be generous.  From humility comes responsible leadership.”  —Lao-Tse

Once we are on the journey of balance, we are then ready to seek the harmony of the “me/we” relationship that allows the healing of our world and those of its inhabitants.  We learn of how we connect and influence community.  We learn and share the vibrations that are so subtle, but yet so powerful.  These vibrations can only be felt with the heart and measured by the health and harmony of our internal and external environments.

We begin our quest with tea, share it through meditation & prayer, and grow it through our understanding and developing awareness as keys to unlock the secrets within.  Meditation & prayer unfolds Lao Tse’s compassionate courage, tea flowers the economy of generosity, and our growing humility through understanding allows us to lead others by example.

 

“One sees clearly only with the heart. What is essential is invisible to the eyes.”                                                                    Antoine de St. Exupery

 

Thomas Lalevich has had an ongoing meditation practice since 1974 when he was instructed in the art of Transcendental Meditation – TM. His goal at that time was to enhance his abilities in college athletics. The consciousness expanding qualities he discovered were an added and appreciated benefit.  When the consumption of tea was added to his practice, the benefit to health, faith and prayer were pronounced. Certification to teach and instruct was obtained under the guidance of the Kriya Yoga Seminary of Chicago on May 1, 2012.

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Tea Ceremony for Peace

Posted by Thomas Lalevich on

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